Financial literacy self-assessment quiz

Take this self-assessment quiz to figure out how your financial literacy skills and knowledge measure up compared to other Canadians.



Investment knowledge quiz

Most people know a little about investing, but they need to know more to be able to manage their investments to meet their goals. Try this quiz by the FCAC to see if your knowledge is basic or more advanced.



National financial literacy strategy video gallery



Pilot study: Buy now, pay later services in Canada

A key component of the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada’s (FCAC’s) mandate is to monitor and evaluate trends and emerging issues that may have an impact on consumers of financial products and services. Technological innovations in financial services and shifting consumer behaviours have resulted in a steady increase in retail e-commerce sales over the past several years, and the COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on how consumers make retail purchases. Retail e-commerce sales reached record levels during the pandemic. This has further contributed to the proliferation of buy now, pay later (BNPL) services in Canada.



Financial consumer protection framework

This presentation provides information about the FCAC's public awareness strategy for Canada's new Financial Consumer Protection Framework including an overview of FCAC's planned activities and resources and highlights the importance of collective action to inform Canadians. 

Additional promotional toolkits can be found on the FCAC website. 



FCAC new consumer information – electronic alerts

Le français suit l’anglais.

As of June 30, 2022, banks will be required to send electronic alerts to their customers to help them manage their finances and avoid unnecessary fees.  Some banks have already started sending these alerts to their customers.  The electronic alerts are part of the new and enhanced protections in Canada’s Financial Consumer Protection Framework (the Framework) that comes into effect on June 30, 2022.

To inform Canadians about electronic alerts and their benefits, the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) published new consumer information on electronic alerts, developed an infographic, and prepared social media content that you can use on your own social media channels.

Under the Framework, banks will be required to:

  • disclose key information to help their customers make timely and informed decisions
  • provide customers with more timely complaint-handling services
  • offer and sell products or services to customers that are appropriate for their circumstances
  • respect new rules to avoid misleading customers or applying undue pressure on customers when selling them products and service

À compter du 30 juin 2022, les banques seront tenues d’envoyer des alertes électroniques à leurs clients afin de les aider à gérer leurs finances et à éviter de payer inutilement des frais, ce que certaines ont déjà commencé à faire. Ces alertes font partie des mesures de protection nouvelles ou améliorées prévues dans le Cadre de protection des consommateurs de produits et services financiers du Canada (le Cadre) qui entre en vigueur le 30 juin 2022. 

Pour informer les Canadiens et les Canadiennes à propos des alertes électroniques et de leurs avantages, l’Agence de la consommation en matière financière du Canada (ACFC) a publié de nouveaux renseignements à ce sujet pour les consommateurs. Elle a également créé une infographie et préparé du contenu pour les réseaux sociaux que vous pouvez utiliser dans vos propres comptes de médias sociaux.  

En vertu des dispositions du Cadre, les banques seront tenues :  

  • de communiquer aux consommateurs des renseignements importants pour les aider à prendre des décisions éclairées en temps opportun;
  • de fournir à leurs clients des services plus rapides de traitement des plaintes;
  • de veiller à ce que les produits et services qu’elles offrent ou vendent à leurs clients leur conviennent, compte tenu de leur situation;
  • de respecter de nouvelles règles de protection des consommateurs afin d’éviter de leur fournir des renseignements trompeurs ou d’exercer des pressions indues sur eux lorsqu’elles leur offrent ou leur vendent des produits et services.



How women can save more money

This webinar hosted by FCAC (originally broadcast on November 17, 2021) targets women who want to learn more about managing money and building saving habits.

Guest speaker, personal financial expert, Rubina Ahmed-Haq has also contributed to Canada's financial literacy blog on "Women face unique money challenges".

Helpful links related to the content matter in this video:

Budget Planner

Getting help from a credit counsellor

Choosing a financial advisor

 



Pilot Study: Buy Now, Pay Later Services in Canada

The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) has published a pilot study on the use and understanding of Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL) services in Canada as part of the Agency’s research on emerging consumers trends.

Similar to instalment loans, BNPL services allow consumers to purchase goods and services and pay for them over time, either by spreading their payments out into equal, smaller instalments, or by delaying their payments.

Among those surveyed, 34% indicated that they were familiar with these services, and 8% indicated that they had used at least one such service between September 2019 to March 2021. The most common items purchased this way included furniture or appliances (39%), electronics (32%), and clothing and fashion (23%); however, some consumers used the services for household essentials (8%) and groceries (5%). As these findings are based on a small sample, additional research is needed to establish a more comprehensive picture of how Canadians use and understand BNPL services.



Make Change that Counts: National Financial Literacy Strategy 2021-2026

The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada’s (FCAC’s) mandate is to protect Canadian financial consumers and strengthen financial literacy. 

The National Strategy is a 5-year plan to create a more accessible, inclusive, and effective financial ecosystem that supports diverse Canadians in meaningful ways. The National Strategy is focused on how financial literacy stakeholders can reduce barriers, catalyze action, and work together, to collectively help Canadians build financial resilience.



Review of Financial Literacy Research in Canada: An Environmental Scan and Gap Analysis

The Review of Financial Literacy Research in Canada highlights past and current advancements in financial literacy research (produced by government and non-governmental stakeholders) while identifying existing gaps within the financial landscape. The overriding goal is to help strengthen the financial well-being of all Canadians. The review contains four research priorities: managing debt, navigating the financial marketplace, building savings, and budgeting.



Financial Literacy Month – 10th anniversary Resources

For the 10th anniversary of Financial Literacy Month in Canada, Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) has released resources to help Canadians learn how to manage their finances in challenging times.

Resources include the following topics:

  • Keep track of your money
  • Minimize debt
  • Reassess financial goals
  • Protect yourself against financial fraud
  • Set up an emergency fund
  • Understand financial products and services

 



COVID-19: Managing financial health in challenging times

This guide from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada shares guidelines and financial tips to help Canadians during COVID-19. The topics include: getting through a financial emergency, where to ask questions or voice concerns, what to do if your branch closes, and more.

Infographic: Avoid financial stress, save for emergencies

This infographic illustrates the importance of having an emergency fund and how to build one.



Using Research to Improve the Financial Well-being of Canadians: Post-symposium Report

The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) co-hosted the 2018 National Research Symposium on Financial Literacy on November 26 and 27, 2018 at the University of Toronto, in partnership with Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR).

This report presents the key ideas and takeaways from the event, while shining a light on the research shaping new solutions designed to enhance financial well-being in Canada and around the world.



Budget Planner

The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC)'s online tool helps you create a customized budget.



Canadians and their money: Key findings from the 2019 Canadian Financial Capability Survey

This report provides results from the 2019 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS). It offers a first look at what Canadians are doing to take charge of their finances by budgeting, planning and saving for the future, and paying down debt. While the findings show that many Canadians are acting to improve their financial literacy and financial well-being, there are also emerging signs of financial stress for some Canadians. For example, about one third of Canadians feel they have too much debt, and a growing number are having trouble making bill, rent/mortgage and other payments on time.

Over the past 5 years, about 4 in 10 Canadians found ways to increase their financial knowledge, skills and confidence. They used a wide range of methods, such as reading books or other printed material on financial issues, using online resources, and pursuing financial education through work, school or community programs. Findings from the survey support evidence that financial literacy, resources and tools are helping Canadians manage their money. For example, those who have a budget have greater financial well-being based on a number of indicators, such as managing cashflow, making bill payments and paying down debt. Further, those with a
financial plan to save are more likely to feel better prepared and more confident about their retirement.



Financial well-being in Canada

Financial well-being is the extent to which you can comfortably meet all of your current financial commitments and needs while also having the financial resilience to continue doing so in the future. But it is not only about income. It is also about having control over your finances, being able to absorb a financial setback, being on track to meet your financial goals, and—perhaps most of all—having the financial freedom to make choices that allow you to enjoy life.

The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) participated in a multi-country initiative that sought to measure financial well-being. FCAC conducted this survey to understand and describe the realities of Canadians across the financial well-being spectrum and help policy-makers, practitioners and Canadians themselves achieve better financial well-being. This is in keeping with the Agency’s ongoing work to monitor trends and emerging issues that affect Canadians and their finances.



Mortgage Calculator

This calculator from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada determines your mortgage payment and provides you with a mortgage payment schedule.

Account Comparison Tool

Compare features for different chequing and savings accounts, including interest rates, monthly fees and transactions. Find an account that best suits your needs. Narrow your search, view search results, and compare your results using this account comparison tool from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada.

Credit Card Payment Calculator

This tool from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada will help you compare different payment options to pay off your credit card balance.

statement. If you can't, you can still reduce the amount of interest you will have to pay. The credit card payment calculator compares 3 different payment options to pay off your credit card balance.



What to do when you get an income tax refund


This is a document from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada explaining tips on how to manage your refund at tax time to make the most of it.



Payday Loans: Market Trends

Buying and Maintaining a Home: Planning Your Housing Budget

Renewing and Renegotiating Your Mortgage

Tips to save money while you’re in school

Save for Your Child’s Education with an RESP

Shopping Around for a Mortgage

Shopping Around for a Line of Credit

Thinking of Opening a Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA)?

Understanding Credit Card Fees (Financial Literacy Series)

Understanding your Credit Report and Credit Score

Understanding Variable Interest Rate Mortgages

Be Smart with Your Credit Card: Tips to Help You Use Your Credit Card Wisely

Buying Your First Home: Three Steps to Successful Mortgage Shopping

Cashing your Government of Canada Cheque for Free

Cheque Hold Periods: Your Right to Access Your Money


This is a guide on cheque hold periods when banking in Canada. When you receive a cheque, you may consider two things before deciding where to cash it: When can you get your money? How much will it cost you to cash the cheque? Although cheque cashing services may make money available immediately, they generally charge much higher fees than financial institutions do. If you have an account with a bank or another federally regulated financial institution, there are laws that set out when the institution must make the money from a cheque available to you. In most cases, you can get access to the first $100 right away if you choose to cash your cheque in a branch.


Choosing the Right Chequing Account and Banking Package

Choosing the Right Savings Account

Credit Cards: Understanding Your Rights and Your Responsibilities

How to Make a Complaint

How to Order Your Credit Report

What You Should Know if Your Branch Closes

International Review: Mobile Payments and Consumer Protection

Managing Debt: Getting Help from a Credit Counselling Agency

Mortgage Prepayment; Know Your Options. Smart mortgage decisions start here

Opening a Personal Bank Account: Understanding Your Rights

Paying off Your Mortgage Faster

Protecting Your Credit Report: How to Correct Errors and Check for Fraud


Your credit report is important for your financial health. It can help you get approved for credit cards and other loans. It can also affect your ability to rent housing or get hired for a job.
Protect your credit report by checking carefully for errors and signs of identity theft. You have the right to dispute any information in your credit report that you believe is wrong. You can ask the credit reporting agencies to correct errors. It’s free.


Banking Fees in Canada: Patterns and Trends

Before You Sign any Contract: 10 Things You Need to Know

Considering A Payday Loan? 10 Questions To Ask


If you’re short on cash, a payday loan may seem like a quick way to get money, but there is a high cost. Fees on payday loans are generally much higher than those on other forms of credit, and they will take a big bite out of your budget. Make sure you have all the facts about a payday loan by asking the following questions.


Auto Finance: Market Trends

Payday Loans: An Expensive Way to Borrow