Guide de recours : Lors d’un conflit avec un fournisseur de communication

A guide for consumers to help with problems related to communications services. Information is provided to allow consumers to better assert their rights and facilitate the resolution of a dispute with communication service providers. (Please note this is a French-language resource.)



Making Safety Affordable: Intimate Partner Violence is an Asset-Building Issue

This brief explores three existing unmet needs that contribute to survivors’ inability to build wealth: money, tailored asset-building support, and safe and responsive banking and credit services. Within each identified need, specific issues facing survivors, strategic actions in response to those issues, as well as innovative ideas and existing promising practices to help funders take action to prioritize survivor wealth are discussed.



Disability Alliance BC

Disability Alliance BC supports people in British Columbia with disabilities through direct services, community partnerships, advocacy, research and publications.

Their website provides information on disability benefits including the Disability Tax Credit (DTC), CPP Disability, Registered Disability Savings Plans (RDSP) and more.



Plan Institute Learning Centre

The Plan Institute Learning Centre presents workshops, webinars, publications and other resources for individuals and/or families of a person with a disability, support-care workers, and organizations.



Questions and answers to legal topics in Ontario

The Community of Legal Education Ontario (CLEO) website contains answers to common questions pertaining to a number of legal topics, including: COVID-19, debt and consumer rights, and employment and work.



Identity theft

Identity thieves try to use your personal information to take money from your bank account, shop with your credit card, or even commit crimes in your name. This publication explains how to spot the warning signs of identity theft, how to protect yourself, and what you can do if it happens to you.



Your rights at work

This publication explains a worker’s legal rights under the Employment Standards Act regarding hours of work and pay, overtime, breaks, holidays and vacations, and leave from your job. It also has information about how to make a claim against an employer.



Workers’ Compensation: Making a claim

This resource explains what a worker should do if they have a job-related injury or disease, how they can apply for benefits from the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board, and what happens when the Board gets a report of their injury. It also has sections about what their employer must do, and where injured workers can get legal help.



Legal Resources Catalogue: Free legal information

This resource provides a list of free legal information resources produced by Community Legal Education Ontario (CLEO).



Getting Legal Help: A Directory of Community Legal Clinics in Ontario

This resource provides a directory of community legal clinics in Ontario.

Community legal clinics provide information, advice, and representation on various legal issues, including social assistance, housing, refugee and immigration law, employment law, human rights, workers' compensation, consumer law, and the Canada Pension Plan. Some legal clinics do not handle all of these issues, but staff may be able to refer you to someone who can help.

Community legal clinics are staffed by lawyers, community legal workers, and sometimes law students. Each legal clinic is run by a volunteer board of directors with members from the community. All help is private and confidential and provided free of charge.



Investor Protection Clinic and Living Lab: 2019 Annual Report

The Investor Protection Clinic, the first clinic of its kind in Canada, provides free legal advice to people who believe their investments were mishandled and who cannot afford a lawyer. The Clinic was founded together with the Canadian Foundation for Advancement of Investor Rights (FAIR Canada), an organization that aims to enhance the rights of Canadian shareholders and individual investors.

The 2019 Annual Report summarizes the work of The Clinic, including description of the work and types of cases, example case scenarios of the clients who benefited from The Clinic's services,  client data and demographics, and recommendations. 



Managing Debt & Setting Goals for the Future

Consumer Experiences with Debt Collection – Findings from the CFPB’s Survey of Consumer Views on Debt

Big Money: Structuring Minor’s Trust Programs for Native Communities


This manual is intended to help tribal leaders and their attorneys, financial advisors, and money managers in Native communities in the US think about innovative ways to structure minor’s trust programs. It turns out there are a lot of simple things that can be done to help kids make good decisions when they get their Big Money.


Developing Innovations in Tribal Per Capita Distribution Payment Programs: Promoting Education, Savings, and Investments for the Future

How to Make a Complaint

Managing Debt: Getting Help from a Credit Counselling Agency

Aide sociale: règles qui s’appliquent aux couples


Lisez la présente brochure pour connaître les règles que les agents d’Ontario au travail (OT) et du Programme ontarien de soutien aux personnes handicapées (POSPH) appliquent pour décider :
••si 2 adultes qui habitent ensemble sont des conjoints ou conjointes
••si 2 personnes qui habitent ensemble doivent présenter leur demande d’aide sociale en tant que couple


Appel d’une décision en matière d’aide sociale

Do you know a woman who is being abused? A legal rights handbook.

Making a humanitarian and compassionate (H&C) application

Humanitarian and compassionate (H&C) applications and refugee claims: how are they different?

Before You Sign any Contract: 10 Things You Need to Know

Understanding the Legal Dimensions of Financial Literacy: Power of Attorney

NYC’s Paid Sick Leave Law: First Year Milestones

A Woman’s Guide to Money, Relationships, and the Law in Ontario


Many laws affect your financial rights and responsibilities within your relationships. In Ontario most of the laws apply to two-person relationships and some laws apply differently to married couples than to partners who are not married. Either way, these law can affect you financially when you enter a new relationship and when you end one. Even when you are happily entering a new relationship, it is important to plan ahead, to be aware of what you are entitled to if the relationship ends, and to know the laws and how they relate to your situation. This guide outlines the financial rights and responsibilities of people in relationships in Ontario and highlights the differences for married women and women who are in spousal relationships but are not married.