Make Change that Counts: National Financial Literacy Strategy 2021-2026

The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada’s (FCAC’s) mandate is to protect Canadian financial consumers and strengthen financial literacy. 

The National Strategy is a 5-year plan to create a more accessible, inclusive, and effective financial ecosystem that supports diverse Canadians in meaningful ways. The National Strategy is focused on how financial literacy stakeholders can reduce barriers, catalyze action, and work together, to collectively help Canadians build financial resilience.



Review of Financial Literacy Research in Canada: An Environmental Scan and Gap Analysis

The Review of Financial Literacy Research in Canada highlights past and current advancements in financial literacy research (produced by government and non-governmental stakeholders) while identifying existing gaps within the financial landscape. The overriding goal is to help strengthen the financial well-being of all Canadians. The review contains four research priorities: managing debt, navigating the financial marketplace, building savings, and budgeting.



Financial Literacy Month – 10th anniversary Resources

For the 10th anniversary of Financial Literacy Month in Canada, Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) has released resources to help Canadians learn how to manage their finances in challenging times.

Resources include the following topics:

  • Keep track of your money
  • Minimize debt
  • Reassess financial goals
  • Protect yourself against financial fraud
  • Set up an emergency fund
  • Understand financial products and services

 



COVID-19: Managing financial health in challenging times

This guide from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada shares guidelines and financial tips to help Canadians during COVID-19. The topics include: getting through a financial emergency, where to ask questions or voice concerns, what to do if your branch closes, and more.

Implementing the National Strategy for Financial Literacy – Count me In, Canada

The Government of Canada has long recognized the need to strengthen financial consumers’ knowledge and decision-making abilities, and has made it a key priority. When more Canadians feel more in control of their finances, the benefits are immediate and potentially far-reaching. 

In this report, the Financial Consumer Protection Agency (FCAC) looks back over the past four years, beginning in 2015 with the release of the National Strategy for Financial Literacy—Count me in, Canada and its vision to strengthen the financial well-being
of all Canadians. They report on progress in helping Canadians strengthen their financial knowledge and decision-making, manage their day-to-day finances, and plan for their futures. 



Financial Literacy Outcome Evaluation Tool

The Financial Literacy Outcome Evaluation Tool offers organizations a collection of evidence-based financial literacy outcomes and indicators. The tool guides users through a series of questions about their program and evaluation goals and then suggests scales (sets of questions) and individual questions they can use.



Infographic: Avoid financial stress, save for emergencies

This infographic illustrates the importance of having an emergency fund and how to build one.



Budget Planner

The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC)'s online tool helps you create a customized budget.



Canadians and their money: Key findings from the 2019 Canadian Financial Capability Survey

This report provides results from the 2019 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS). It offers a first look at what Canadians are doing to take charge of their finances by budgeting, planning and saving for the future, and paying down debt. While the findings show that many Canadians are acting to improve their financial literacy and financial well-being, there are also emerging signs of financial stress for some Canadians. For example, about one third of Canadians feel they have too much debt, and a growing number are having trouble making bill, rent/mortgage and other payments on time.

Over the past 5 years, about 4 in 10 Canadians found ways to increase their financial knowledge, skills and confidence. They used a wide range of methods, such as reading books or other printed material on financial issues, using online resources, and pursuing financial education through work, school or community programs. Findings from the survey support evidence that financial literacy, resources and tools are helping Canadians manage their money. For example, those who have a budget have greater financial well-being based on a number of indicators, such as managing cashflow, making bill payments and paying down debt. Further, those with a
financial plan to save are more likely to feel better prepared and more confident about their retirement.



Financial well-being in Canada

Financial well-being is the extent to which you can comfortably meet all of your current financial commitments and needs while also having the financial resilience to continue doing so in the future. But it is not only about income. It is also about having control over your finances, being able to absorb a financial setback, being on track to meet your financial goals, and—perhaps most of all—having the financial freedom to make choices that allow you to enjoy life.

The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) participated in a multi-country initiative that sought to measure financial well-being. FCAC conducted this survey to understand and describe the realities of Canadians across the financial well-being spectrum and help policy-makers, practitioners and Canadians themselves achieve better financial well-being. This is in keeping with the Agency’s ongoing work to monitor trends and emerging issues that affect Canadians and their finances.



Backgrounder: Preliminary findings from Canada’s Financial Well-Being Survey

This backgrounder reports preliminary findings from a survey of financial well-being among Canadian adults. 

Preliminary analysis of the survey data indicates that two behaviours are particularly important in supporting the financial well-being of Canadians. First, our analysis indicates that Canadians who practice active savings behaviour have higher levels of financial resilience as well as higher levels of overall financial well-being. In other words, regardless of the amount of money someone makes, regular efforts to save for unexpected expenses and other future priorities appears to be the key to feeling and being in control of personal finances.

Secondly, Canadians who often use credit to pay for daily expenses because they have run short of money have lower levels of financial well-being. While this behaviour is likely symptomatic of low levels of financial well-being, our analysis indicates that a person can substantially improve their financial resilience and financial well-being by implementing strategies to reduce the frequency of running out of money and of having to rely on credit to get by.



Mortgage Calculator

This calculator from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada determines your mortgage payment and provides you with a mortgage payment schedule.

Account Comparison Tool

Compare features for different chequing and savings accounts, including interest rates, monthly fees and transactions. Find an account that best suits your needs. Narrow your search, view search results, and compare your results using this account comparison tool from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada.

Credit Card Payment Calculator

This tool from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada will help you compare different payment options to pay off your credit card balance.

statement. If you can't, you can still reduce the amount of interest you will have to pay. The credit card payment calculator compares 3 different payment options to pay off your credit card balance.



Your Money Seniors


Your Money Seniors is a financial literacy program for seniors. Modelled on the CBA’s highly successful Your Money Students program, this seminar program is offered in French and English, free of charge, to seniors’ groups across the country.

Your Money Seniors is presented by bankers in the community volunteering their time and expertise and covers how seniors can:




What to do when you get an income tax refund


This is a document from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada explaining tips on how to manage your refund at tax time to make the most of it.



Payday Loans: Market Trends

Buying and Maintaining a Home: Planning Your Housing Budget

Renewing and Renegotiating Your Mortgage

Tips to save money while you’re in school

Save for Your Child’s Education with an RESP

Shopping Around for a Mortgage

Shopping Around for a Line of Credit

Thinking of Opening a Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA)?

Understanding Credit Card Fees (Financial Literacy Series)

Understanding your Credit Report and Credit Score

Understanding Variable Interest Rate Mortgages

Be Smart with Your Credit Card: Tips to Help You Use Your Credit Card Wisely

Buying Your First Home: Three Steps to Successful Mortgage Shopping

Cashing your Government of Canada Cheque for Free

Cheque Hold Periods: Your Right to Access Your Money


This is a guide on cheque hold periods when banking in Canada. When you receive a cheque, you may consider two things before deciding where to cash it: When can you get your money? How much will it cost you to cash the cheque? Although cheque cashing services may make money available immediately, they generally charge much higher fees than financial institutions do. If you have an account with a bank or another federally regulated financial institution, there are laws that set out when the institution must make the money from a cheque available to you. In most cases, you can get access to the first $100 right away if you choose to cash your cheque in a branch.


Choosing the Right Chequing Account and Banking Package

Choosing the Right Savings Account

Credit Cards: Understanding Your Rights and Your Responsibilities

How to Make a Complaint

How to Order Your Credit Report

What You Should Know if Your Branch Closes

International Review: Mobile Payments and Consumer Protection

Managing Debt: Getting Help from a Credit Counselling Agency

Mortgage Prepayment; Know Your Options. Smart mortgage decisions start here

Opening a Personal Bank Account: Understanding Your Rights

Paying off Your Mortgage Faster

Protecting Your Credit Report: How to Correct Errors and Check for Fraud


Your credit report is important for your financial health. It can help you get approved for credit cards and other loans. It can also affect your ability to rent housing or get hired for a job.
Protect your credit report by checking carefully for errors and signs of identity theft. You have the right to dispute any information in your credit report that you believe is wrong. You can ask the credit reporting agencies to correct errors. It’s free.


Before You Sign any Contract: 10 Things You Need to Know

Why Financial Capability Matters – Synthesis Report on Canadians and Their Money: A National Symposium on Financial Capability

Considering A Payday Loan? 10 Questions To Ask


If you’re short on cash, a payday loan may seem like a quick way to get money, but there is a high cost. Fees on payday loans are generally much higher than those on other forms of credit, and they will take a big bite out of your budget. Make sure you have all the facts about a payday loan by asking the following questions.


Auto Finance: Market Trends

Payday Loans: An Expensive Way to Borrow

Managing Money and Planning for the Future: Key Findings from the 2014 Canadian Financial Capability Survey

Moving Forward with Financial Literacy. Synthesis Report on Reaching Higher: Canadian Conference on Financial Literacy

Strengthening Financial Literacy Through Collaboration: Highlights of the 2014 National Conference on Financial Literacy

National Strategy for Financial Literacy. Phase 1: Strengthening Seniors’ Financial Literacy