Make Change that Counts: National Financial Literacy Strategy 2021-2026

The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada’s (FCAC’s) mandate is to protect Canadian financial consumers and strengthen financial literacy. 

The National Strategy is a 5-year plan to create a more accessible, inclusive, and effective financial ecosystem that supports diverse Canadians in meaningful ways. The National Strategy is focused on how financial literacy stakeholders can reduce barriers, catalyze action, and work together, to collectively help Canadians build financial resilience.



Why the Time is Right for a Guaranteed Income with an Equity Lens

Over 50+ mayors in the United States have joined a national initiative Mayor’s for Guaranteed Income (MGI). Many advocates and practitioners now believe the moment has arrived for a guaranteed Income with an equity lens. In this webinar, perspectives from a diverse group of thought leaders involved in GI initiatives including practitioners, government representatives and philanthropy were heard. Panelists shared outcomes and new research results from some of the most successful GI pilots in the country (Stockton and Mississippi); goals for the newly launched Mayor’s for Guaranteed Income; how philanthropy can play a catalytic role and what this moment tells us about the future of guaranteed income initiatives.



Cash Back: A Yellowhead Institute Red Paper

This report looks at how the dispossession of Indigenous lands nearly destroyed Indigenous economic livelihoods and discusses restitution from the perspective of stolen wealth.



3 Principles for an Antiracist, Equitable State Response to COVID-19 — and a Stronger Recovery

COVID-19’s effects have underscored the ways that racism, bias, and discrimination are embedded in health, social, and economic systems. Black, Indigenous, and Latinx people are experiencing higher rates of infection, hospitalization, and death, and people of color are also overrepresented in jobs that are at higher infection risk and hardest hit economically. Shaping these outcomes are structural barriers like wealth and income disparities, inadequate access to health care, and racial discrimination built into the health system and labor market.

This article discusses three recommended principles for guiding policymakers in making equity efforts.



Emerging Technology for All: Conversational AI’s Pivotal Role

This infographic is a preview of Commonwealth's research survey of 1290 lower-and moderate-income people to understand their perceptions, needs, and uses of conversational AI. 

Responding to Client’s “Now, Soon, & Later” Needs

This is a three-part webinar series exploring how practitioners, policymakers, and product developers are supporting the diverse savings needs of LMI households during the ongoing crisis. Solutions that help families save flexibly for short, intermediate, and/or long-term goals that address their current and future needs are discussed.



Racial Equity In Philanthropy: Closing the Funding Gap

The Bridgespan Group is a social impact consultant and advisor to nonprofits and NGOs, philanthropists, and investors. This collection of resources discuss the barriers that leaders of color face in securing philanthropic funding.

Impacts of the Covid-19 Pandemic on Women: Report of the Standing Committee on the Status of Women

The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have been profound and far-reaching. Beyond endangering the health of Canadians, the pandemic has worsened inequalities among groups of people. Women, girls and gender-diverse people have faced unique challenges during the pandemic.

The Committee recommends that the Government of Canada take various actions to assist women, girls and gender-diverse people during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Many recommendations relate to improving women’s health and labour force participation. Some recommendations focus specifically on women’s paid and unpaid care work. The Committee also recommends interventions to help reduce trafficking and violence against women.



Budget 2021: A Recovery Plan for Jobs, Growth, and Resilience



2020 Second Annual Report of the Disability Advisory Committee

In November 2017, the Minister of National Revenue, the Honourable Diane Lebouthillier, announced the creation of the Disability Advisory Committee to provide advice to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) on interpreting and administering tax measures for persons with disabilities in a fair, transparent and accessible manner. The committee’s full mandate is attached as Appendix A. Key disability tax measures are described in Appendix B.

Our first annual report, Enabling access to disability tax measures, was published in May 2019. Since that time, we believe there has been important progress with respect to the administration of and communications about the disability tax credit (DTC). Our second annual report describes in detail the many improvements that the CRA has introduced over the past year in response to the recommendations in our 2019 report. These changes are summarized in “The Client Experience” on the following pages.

Section 1 of this second annual report presents a review of the 42 recommendations made in our first annual report. Each recommendation summarizes the relevant context and associated follow-up actions.

Section 2 covers the new areas of conversation during the second year of our mandate. Selected topics focus, for example, on DTC data, concerns of Indigenous peoples and eligibility for a registered disability savings plan.

Section 3 includes the appendices, which provide details not covered in the text.



Opportunity for All – Canada’s First Poverty Reduction Strategy

Canada is a prosperous country, yet in 2015 roughly 1 in 8 Canadians lived in poverty. The vision of Opportunity for All – Canada's First Poverty Reduction Strategy is a Canada without poverty, because we all suffer when our fellow citizens are left behind. We are all in this together, from governments, to community organizations, to the private sector, to all Canadians who are working hard each and every day to provide for themselves and their families.

For the first time in Canada's history, the Strategy sets an official measure of povertyCanada's Official Poverty Line, based on the cost of a basket of goods and services that individuals and families require to meet their basic needs and achieve a modest standard of living in communities across the country.

Opportunity for All sets, for the first time, ambitious and concrete poverty reduction targets: a 20% reduction in poverty by 2020 and a 50% reduction in poverty by 2030, which, relative to 2015 levels, will lead to the lowest poverty rate in Canada's history.

Through Opportunity for All, we are putting in place a National Advisory Council on Poverty to advise the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development on poverty reduction and to publicly report, in each year, on the progress that has been made toward poverty reduction.

The Government also proposes to introduce the first Poverty Reduction Act in Parliament in Canada’s history. This Act would entrench the targets, Canada's Official Poverty Line, and the Advisory Council into legislation.



GFLEC – Finlit Talks

This video series offers concise summaries of in-depth academic and practitioner presentations, in plain English, for dissemination to a worldwide audience. For convenient viewing, most videos are between three and six minutes long.



2021 Reports of the Auditor General of Canada to the Parliament of Canada – Report 4 – Canada Child Benefit

A report from Auditor General Karen Hogan concludes that the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) managed the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) program so that millions of eligible families received accurate and timely payments. The audit also reviewed the one-time additional payment of up to $300 per child issued in May 2020 to help eligible families during the COVID‑19 pandemic.

The audit noted areas where the agency could improve the administration of the program by changing how it manages information it uses to assess eligibility to the CCB. For example, better use of information received from other federal organizations would help ensure that the agency is informed when a beneficiary has left the country. This would avoid cases where payments are issued on the basis of outdated information. To enhance the integrity of the program, the agency should request that all applicants provide a valid proof of birth when they apply for the benefit.

The audit also raised the concept of female presumption and noted that given the diversity of families in Canada today, this presumption has had an impact on the administration of the Canada Child Benefit program.



Creating Change: Momentum’s Contribution to High-Cost Credit Reform in Alberta

As part of Momentum’s systems change planning process that was grounded in both participant and community experience, the issue of payday loans and other forms of high-cost credit (e.g., pawn, installment, rent-to-own, title and car loans) emerged as a priority issue for Momentum to address the financial barriers for people living on low incomes to exit poverty and build sustainable livelihoods.
To evaluate its work for high-cost credit reform in Calgary and Alberta in the period of 2012 to 2019, an outcome harvest was conducted. This evaluation reflects the collective efforts of multiple partners, identifies outcomes achieved as well as Momentum’s contribution to these outcomes.



Together BC: British Columbia’s Poverty Reduction Strategy

 British Columbia’s Poverty Reduction Strategy, sets a path to reduce overall poverty in B.C. by 25% and child poverty by 50% by 2024.

With investments from across Government, TogetherBC reflects government’s commitment to reduce poverty and make life more affordable for British Columbians. It includes policy initiatives and investments designed to lift people up, break the cycle of poverty and build a better B.C. for everyone.

Built on the principles of Affordability, Opportunity, Reconciliation, and Social Inclusion, TogetherBC focuses on six priority action areas:

  • More affordable housing for more people
  • Supporting families, children and youth
  • Expanding access to education and training
  • More opportunities, more jobs
  • Improving income supports
  • Investing in social inclusion



Taking Stock and Looking Ahead: The Impact of COVID-19 on Communities of Color

Nearly a year since the outbreak began, and eight months since it was declared a global pandemic, COVID-19 has devastated hundreds of thousands of lives and millions of people’s economic prospects throughout the country. To date, the effects of this crisis have been wide-reaching and profound, impacting every individual and sector throughout the U.S.

For communities of color, however, the pandemic has been particularly damaging as these communities have not only been more likely to contract and succumb to the virus, but also more likely to bear the brunt of the many economic impacts that have come from it—including more likely to be unemployed and slower to regain jobs lost.

The Asset Building Policy Network and a panel of experts discuss the impact COVID-19 has had on communities of color, the fiscal policy measures congress has enacted to curtail those impacts and what can be done through policy and programs to foster an equitable recovery and more inclusive economy moving forward.



Strengthening the Economic Foundation for Youth and Young Adults During COVID & Beyond

The unemployment rate for young workers ages 16–24 jumped from 8.4% to 24.4% from spring 2019 to spring 2020 in the United States, representing four million youth. While unemployment for their counterparts ages 25 and older rose from 2.8% to 11.3% the Spring 2020 unemployment rates were even higher for young Black, Hispanic, and Asian American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) workers (29.6%, 27.5%, and 29.7%, respectively. 

The following speakers discuss how to build financial security for youth (16-24) in this webinar: Monique Miles, Aspen Institute, Forum for Community Solutions, Margaret Libby, My Path, Amadeos Oyagata, Youth Leader, and Don Baylor, The Annie E. Casey Foundation (moderator).



Cities Reducing Poverty: 2020 Impact Report

The Vibrant Communities – Cities Reducing Poverty 2020 Impact Report is the Tamarack Institute's first attempt at capturing and communicating national trends in poverty reduction and the important ways in which member Cities Reducing Poverty collaboratives are contributing to those changes.

This impact report is meant for poverty reduction organizers and advocates, and public decision-makers to get a sense for how collaborative, multi-sectoral local roundtables with comprehensive plans contribute to poverty reduction in their communities and beyond; and spotlights high-impact initiatives that are demonstrating promising results.



Report on Income and Canadian Financial Consumer Complaints

This report explores the financial services complaint experiences of Canadians at various income levels who used the Ombudsman for Banking Services and Investments (OBSI)’s service. The national, not-for-profit organization collected demographic and case data for almost 1,000 closed cases resolved between 2017 to 2019 to create the report. These cases were grouped into three categories:

  • lower-income households (under $60,000);
  • middle-income households ($60,000 to $100,000); and
  • higher-income households (over $100,000).

Key findings include:

  • Lower-income households represent almost 40% of OBSI cases. Lower-income consumers of financial services need and make use of OBSI as an accessible alternative to the legal system.
  • Nearly one-third (30%) of employed complainants live in lower- or middle-income households. Canadians experience economic barriers to accessing legal services regardless of their employment status.
  • Most lower-income complainants are over 60, while most higher-income complainants are under 50. Older Canadians have a particular need for accessible dispute resolution.



Costing a Guaranteed Basic Income During the COVID Pandemic

The Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO) supports Parliament by providing economic and financial analysis for the purposes of raising the quality of parliamentary debate and promoting greater budget transparency and accountability.

This report responds to a request from Senator Yuen Pau Woo to estimate the post-COVID cost of a guaranteed basic income (GBI) program, using parameters set out in Ontario’s basic income pilot project. In addition, the report provides an estimate of the federal and provincial programs for low-income individuals and families, including many non-refundable and refundable tax credits that could be replaced by the GBI program.



Economic and Fiscal Snapshot 2020

The COVID-19 crisis is a public health crisis and an economic crisis. The Economic and Fiscal Snapshot 2020 lays out the steps Canada is taking to stabilize the economy and protect the health and economic well-being of Canadians and businesses across the country.



Transformation through disruption: Taxpayers’ Ombudsman Annual Report 2019-20

The mandate of the Taxpayers’ Ombudsman is to assist, advise, and inform the Minister about any matter relating to services provided by the CRA.

The Taxpayers’ Ombudsman fulfills this mandate by raising awareness, upholding taxpayer service rights, and facilitating the resolution of CRA service complaints issues. Through independent and objective reviews of service complaints and systemic issues, the Ombudsman and her Office work to enhance the CRA’s accountability and improve its service to, and treatment of, people. and systemic issues.

This is the Annual Report of the Taxpayers' Ombudsman for 2019-20.



Five good ideas for remote client service work

Marco Campana shares his five good ideas for nonprofit organizations to connect deeply with their clients and communities and to start thinking about what their work might look like in the post-pandemic new normal.



How does the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) impact eligibility of provincial benefits?

This policy backgrounder provides an overview of how provincial and territorial governments have decided to treat receipt of the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) for those receiving social assistance and/or living in subsidized housing. It also looks at provisions for youth aging out of care during the COVID-19 pandemic.



Employer Solutions: From Emergency to Resiliency

In light of COVID-19, the financial security of workers has never been more in question. The workplace is an important delivery channel for tailored financial products and services that can help meet employee’s immediate financial needs and build long-term financial stability.

The workplace is a unique platform to identify, target, and meet the specific financial needs of employees. This webinar gives funders the tools and inspiration to respond effectively to the low- and moderate-income workforce in this moment and beyond.



Are charities ready for social finance? Investment readiness in Canada’s charitable sector

While social finance could have a transformative impact on the funding and financial landscape, relatively little is understood about its implications for charities. This webinar presents the results of a national survey of over 1,000 registered charities undertaken by Imagine Canada to better understand charities’ current readiness to participate in Canada’s growing social finance market



Keys to financial inclusion (podcast series)

The Center for Disability-Inclusive Community Development’s (CDICD) Keys to Financial Inclusion podcast series brings awareness to disability-inclusive community development.

The CDICD works to improve the financial health and well-being of low- and moderate-income (LMI) individuals with disabilities and their families by increasing awareness and usage of opportunities available under the Community Reinvestment Act.



Reaching Out: Improving the Canada Revenue Agency’s Community Volunteer Income Tax Program

The position of Taxpayers’ Ombudsman (the Ombudsman) was created to support the government priorities of stronger democratic institutions, increased transparency within institutions, and fair treatment. As an independent and impartial officer, the Ombudsman handles complaints about the service of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

The Office of the Taxpayers’ Ombudsman hears first-hand the concerns of individuals, tax practitioners, and community support organizations. The Ombudsman visited with Community Volunteer Income Tax Program (CVITP) partner organizations, volunteers, and the Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) CVITP coordinators to learn more about the program and to understand the success stories and challenges they all experience. This report gives voice to what they have heard and provides recommendations on how to address the issues raised.



A workplace-based economic response to COVID-19

This brief emerged from a conversation, held in late March 2020, among a number of individuals and organizations who work on issues of household financial security. Employers with financial resources and governments have an opportunity to use the workplace as a significant channel to deliver financial relief as part of the economic response to COVID-19, complementing critical supports governments are providing to individuals and businesses. 



Seniors: tips to help you this tax season

As a senior, you may be eligible for benefits and credits when you file your taxes. The Canada Revenue Agency has tips to help you get all of them! This page includes tips for seniors at tax time and links to relevant Government of Canada resources. 

Infographic: Avoid financial stress, save for emergencies

This infographic illustrates the importance of having an emergency fund and how to build one.



Using Research to Improve the Financial Well-being of Canadians: Post-symposium Report

The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) co-hosted the 2018 National Research Symposium on Financial Literacy on November 26 and 27, 2018 at the University of Toronto, in partnership with Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR).

This report presents the key ideas and takeaways from the event, while shining a light on the research shaping new solutions designed to enhance financial well-being in Canada and around the world.



Investor Protection Clinic and Living Lab: 2019 Annual Report

The Investor Protection Clinic, the first clinic of its kind in Canada, provides free legal advice to people who believe their investments were mishandled and who cannot afford a lawyer. The Clinic was founded together with the Canadian Foundation for Advancement of Investor Rights (FAIR Canada), an organization that aims to enhance the rights of Canadian shareholders and individual investors.

The 2019 Annual Report summarizes the work of The Clinic, including description of the work and types of cases, example case scenarios of the clients who benefited from The Clinic's services,  client data and demographics, and recommendations. 



Expanding Educational Opportunity Through Savings

This brief discusses the benefits that Children's Savings Accounts (CSAs) bring to help more families save for their children's education. Recommendations to federal policies in the United States are made for the purpose of helping families to start saving early to build greater savings and impact.



State of Cities Reducing Poverty

How has the Vibrant Communities – Cities Reducing Poverty (VC – CRP) network contributed to poverty reduction in Canada? In seeking to answer this central question, the State of Cities Reducing Poverty paper highlights the network’s numerous and varied impacts.



2018 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada: Bold Ambitions for Child and Family Poverty Eradication

The 2018 national report card “Bold Ambitions for Child Poverty Eradication in Canada,” provides a current snapshot of child and family poverty and demonstrates the need for a costed implementation plan to eradicate child poverty in this generation.

In advance of the 30th year of the all-party commitment to eliminate child poverty by the year 2000 and the federal election in 2019, our spotlight is on the central role of universal childcare in the eradication of child poverty. The lack of affordable, high quality childcare robs children of valuable learning environments and keeps parents, mainly women, out of the workforce, education and training. Without childcare, parents cannot lift themselves out of poverty and improve their living standards.



Asset Building: An Effective Poverty-Reduction Strategy

This brief explains the asset-building approach to poverty reduction. 

While many families who live on low incomes struggle to meet basic needs, they miss out on opportunities to save and invest - opportunities that are critical in overcoming poverty. Without income, people are unable to get by and without assets, people are unable to get ahead.

At Momentum, we call opportunities to save or invest, Asset Building.
With financial assets, individuals can pay down debt, save more, earn a good credit rating, save for a down payment on a home, and build a sustainable livelihood.

 



Complaints Related to Service from the CRA: Lessons Learned and Working Towards Better Service

Operating at arm’s length from the Canada Revenue Agency, the Office of the Taxpayers' Ombudsman (OTO) works to enhance the Canada Revenue Agency's (CRA) accountability in its service to, and treatment of, taxpayers through independent and impartial reviews of service-related complaints and systemic issues. OTO receives complaints and concerns from members of First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities.

In this conference presentation, the Taxpayers’ Ombudsman provides examples of the types of issues her Office receives in order to provide community leaders with her insights in helping Indigenous people get better service from the CRA. 

In support of the AFOA Canada 2018 National Conference theme of Human Capital – Balancing Indigenous Culture and Creativity with Modern Workplaces, this presentation will provide participants with information on the types of issues and trends her office sees from members of the Indigenous communities and on better ways of serving these populations.



High-Cost Alternative Financial Services: The Customer Experience

In early 2017 Momentum reached out to over 50 community members and participants to better understand local experiences with high-cost alternative financial services. In addition to connecting with individuals through interviews, Momentum hosted community consultations in partnership with Poverty Talks! and Sunrise Community Link Resource Centre. The following document summarizes what we learned from these conversations and the loan contracts that borrowers shared with us. It also identifies several themes that emerged from these discussions.



Summary Brief: High-Cost Alternative Financial Services

Many Albertans turn to high-cost alternative financial services when they need a short-term fix for a financial issue. Though these services are expensive and unsafe, they are often the only option for low-income individuals, particularly those who struggle to obtain credit at mainstream financial institutions. High-cost alternative financial services contribute to a two-tiered banking system, in which the poor often pay more for inferior services.

Without more stringent regulation, and in the absence of safe and affordable short-term credit options, Albertans living on lower-incomes will continue to experience financial exclusion and take on heavy debt loads – both of which are major contributors to long-term poverty.



High-Cost Alternative Financial Services: Policy Options

Many Canadians turn to high-cost alternative financial services when they need a short-term fix for a budgetary issue. Though these banking and credit alternatives are a convenient choice for individuals in search of fast cash, particularly those who face barriers to obtaining credit at a bank or credit union, access comes at a steep price and with a high degree of risk. On its own, one high-cost loan has the potential to trap a borrower in a cycle of debt, not only amplifying their short-term problem, but also limiting their ability to secure the income and assets needed to thrive in the long term.

The policy recommendations presented in this brief, and summarized in the chart on page two,  are inspired by the regulatory initiatives across the country, and reflect ways in which all three levels of government can contribute to better consumer protection for all Canadians.

 



The Complaints Process for Retail Investments in Canada: A Handbook for Investors

Canadian investors need more and better information to protect themselves  both when they act on their own and when they retain lawyers. This handbook is intended to help Canadian investors better understand the choices they face when making a complaint and the impact of those choices. It can also serve as a guide to assist them when they work with lawyers, particularly those whose law practice does not focus on assisting Canadian investors in obtaining financial compensation.

Implementing Financial Coaching


A presentation on how financial coaching is different, client interaction and program evaluation and coaching as presented by Richard Simonds of Family Services of Greater Houston. 




What to do when you get an income tax refund


This is a document from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada explaining tips on how to manage your refund at tax time to make the most of it.



Handout 5-6: Savings tools (basic)


This handout is from Module 5 of the Financial Literacy facilitator curriculum. Basic description of savings accounts and financial products available in Canada.

To view full Financial Literacy facilitator curriculum, click here.




The Old Age Security program toolkit


The Old Age Security program toolkit – Your complete guide to Canada’s Old Age Security program.

Pre-Budget Tour: The State of the Middle Class

Community Engagement Toolkit


Community engagement is about ensuring that those most impacted by social challenges have a say in designing and implementing solutions. The participation of intended beneficiaries and their families, neighbors, and trusted leaders can be an integral part of data-driven processes to achieve better results. And a shift in power where community members own and help produce the result will lead to greater impact. The following toolkit is meant to guide leaders and groups through a step by step process of building community engagement strategies that will achieve better results for children, families, and communities. This toolkit was developed to expand upon the work highlighted in the Melody Barnes’ and my essay: Community Engagement Matters (Now More Than Ever) in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Spring, 2016.


All about the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) Community Presentation

Poverty Reduction and Disability Income

Power Point for Frameworks Blog Post

Creating Adaptive Prosperity for Indiana Communities

The Canadian student financial aid system: the case for modernization

The association between skills and low income

Data Collection Methods and Food Assessments


This is the slide deck for a webinar presentation by First Nations Development Institute on data collection methods in first nations communities, related to food assessments. It explains the data collection process, what data analysis is, why it is important to have a data analysis plan, qualitative and quantitative methods, types of questions, and more.


Do What You Love: Financial Planning for Artists & Designers

Grad Survey: Ontario University Graduates Are Securing Well-Paying Jobs in their Field

The Survey of 2013 Graduates Shows The Best Path to Career Success is Still a University Degree

Assets and Liabilities, Educational Expectations, and Children’s College Degree Attainment

E-learning methodologies: A guide for designing and developing e-learning courses


The purpose of this guide is to provide detailed guidance on designing and developing an e-learning course for trainers and instructional designers who are new to e-learning design. It also provides basic concepts and information on the processes and resources involved in e-learning development, which might be of interest to capacity-development managers. The information in this guide is based on consolidated instructional design models and learning theories and incorporates FAO’s experience in delivering e-learning courses in development contexts.


Where have all our nest eggs gone?

Planning to retire on a low income: What you need to know

Big Money: Structuring Minor’s Trust Programs for Native Communities


This manual is intended to help tribal leaders and their attorneys, financial advisors, and money managers in Native communities in the US think about innovative ways to structure minor’s trust programs. It turns out there are a lot of simple things that can be done to help kids make good decisions when they get their Big Money.


Thrivers and Strugglers: The Balance Sheets and Financial Health of U.S. Families

Moving to Financial Capability Through Financial Coaching

Debt Management Guide: A Resource for Social Services Professionals


This debt management guide was created to assist volunteers at WoodGreen’s ground-breaking Debt Management Clinic, who meet one-on-one with community members to educate them on their options. It is now available for social services staff who want to know how to help clients deal with debt. This Guide provides a comprehensive explanation of the options available to any debtor in Ontario, with practical advice about what may make the most sense for low-income debtors. It starts with a chart outlining options, and later explains these options in detail. Wherever this Guide isn’t exhaustive, it will direct you to other sources that may provide further and more detailed information on any given topic. It’s wise to check web resources when working with clients on debt management, as policies, amounts, and rights may change from time to time. This Guide is accurate as of March 2012.


Collective Impact 3.0: An Evolving Framework for Community Change

Our Community Can Change When We Work Together Well

Poverty and disability: Looking inside a tie that really binds

Registered Education Savings Plans & The Canada Learning Bond

Cheque Hold Periods: Your Right to Access Your Money


This is a guide on cheque hold periods when banking in Canada. When you receive a cheque, you may consider two things before deciding where to cash it: When can you get your money? How much will it cost you to cash the cheque? Although cheque cashing services may make money available immediately, they generally charge much higher fees than financial institutions do. If you have an account with a bank or another federally regulated financial institution, there are laws that set out when the institution must make the money from a cheque available to you. In most cases, you can get access to the first $100 right away if you choose to cash your cheque in a branch.


Protecting Your Credit Report: How to Correct Errors and Check for Fraud


Your credit report is important for your financial health. It can help you get approved for credit cards and other loans. It can also affect your ability to rent housing or get hired for a job.
Protect your credit report by checking carefully for errors and signs of identity theft. You have the right to dispute any information in your credit report that you believe is wrong. You can ask the credit reporting agencies to correct errors. It’s free.


Your Money, Your Goals: Focus on Native Communities

Aide sociale: règles qui s’appliquent aux couples


Lisez la présente brochure pour connaître les règles que les agents d’Ontario au travail (OT) et du Programme ontarien de soutien aux personnes handicapées (POSPH) appliquent pour décider :
••si 2 adultes qui habitent ensemble sont des conjoints ou conjointes
••si 2 personnes qui habitent ensemble doivent présenter leur demande d’aide sociale en tant que couple


Financial Coaching & Counseling Listening & Learning Series: Taking it to the Next Level: Exploring Financial Coaching Platforms & Putting it All Together

Relying on Erratic Income Sources

Getting By With Limited Resources

Keeping Control by Relying on Cash

Encouraging Savings for Public Benefit Recipients, a Win for Families and States

Welfare Re-form: The Future of Social Policy in Canada

United Way Evaluation Resources


The package has three parts: 1. A series of ten brief evaluation backgrounders that introduce and explore key evaluation topics and terminology; 2. A directory of evaluation resources focusing on technical aspects of evaluation; and 3. A directory of evaluation training options available to organizations based in the Greater Toronto Area. Evaluation is an ever-changing field. In order to make sure the information in this package remains useful, UWTYR staff will review and update the materials every year.


Unstuck: How to Get Out of Your Money Rut and Start Living the Life You Want. Complimentary Workbook

Retiring on a Low Income – Learnings from the Toronto Library and The Ontario Non-Profit Housing Association Presentations

Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

Money Talk for Newcomers

Toronto Employment & Social Services Programs & Services

The destructive legacy of housing segregation

The Community Cure for Health Care

Delivery models for financial literacy interventions – A case study approach

Children in Food Insecure Households

The Impact of Food Insecurity on Health

Monitoring Food Insecurity in Canada

Public Policy and Food Insecurity

RDSP The Registered Disability Savings Plan: Saving for the Future

Unsteady Incomes Keep Millions Behind on Bills

Program Evaluation Toolkit

Newcomer Finances: Instructor’s Manual

Improving Financial Literacy: Analysis of Issues and Policies

How Income Affects Health in Ontario

Retirement Ramp-Up

Savings crisis: 20 years in the making

The savings jackpot

Preventing and Intervening in Situations of Financial Abuse. Ontario Edition

New York Financial Environment

Why It’s So Hard to Regulate Payday Lenders

Income, Life Expectancy, and Community Health. Underscoring the Opportunity.

A Woman’s Guide to Money, Relationships, and the Law in Ontario


Many laws affect your financial rights and responsibilities within your relationships. In Ontario most of the laws apply to two-person relationships and some laws apply differently to married couples than to partners who are not married. Either way, these law can affect you financially when you enter a new relationship and when you end one. Even when you are happily entering a new relationship, it is important to plan ahead, to be aware of what you are entitled to if the relationship ends, and to know the laws and how they relate to your situation. This guide outlines the financial rights and responsibilities of people in relationships in Ontario and highlights the differences for married women and women who are in spousal relationships but are not married.


Household Financial Security Framework

Expiring Operating Agreements: A Planning Guide for Ontario’s Former Federal Housing Programs


Welcome to the first in a series of planning guides on the Expiry of Operating Agreements. Housing Services Corporation has been working for a number of years on the issue of expiring agreements. We see this Guide as a living document. We hope that this Guide will become a trusted resource for you not only for the information it contains, which will be kept up to date, but also as we continue to add links to new resources based on work being done by the various organizations that operate in this sector. In addition to the range of information contained in the Guide, the online version allows you to link to additional resources which have been prepared or collected by Housing Services Corporation.


Financial Capability in the United States 2016

A Toolkit for the evaluation of financial capability programs in low- and middle-income countries

Youthonomics: financial literacy in high school

Having It All: Girls & Financial Literacy

Letter From The Guest Editor: Collective Impact

Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan, 2014-2019

Considering A Payday Loan? 10 Questions To Ask


If you’re short on cash, a payday loan may seem like a quick way to get money, but there is a high cost. Fees on payday loans are generally much higher than those on other forms of credit, and they will take a big bite out of your budget. Make sure you have all the facts about a payday loan by asking the following questions.


Fin Lit Fin Ed and Behaviours

FERN-Youth Financial Empowerment Toolkit

End Poverty in a Generation: A Road Map to Guide Our Journey

Finding A Yardstick – Field Testing Outcome Measures for Community-based Financial Coaching and Capability Programs

Community Volunteer Tax Program: A Guide for Community Organizations

Poverty Reduction Strategy Summary, New Brunswick

The Tenuous Segment: 29 Million Coping, with Little Buffer for Financial Hurdles

Canada Learning Bond Promotional Toolkit


It is what dreams are made of. Everyone knows that in order to make dreams a
reality, post-secondary education is necessary–– and it can be expensive. That’s why we have created the Canada Learning Bond Toolkit: to let families know that there is free money and other grants that will help them start saving early.


Appealing a decision about social assistance


Read this to learn what you can do if you disagree with a decision about assistance from Ontario Works (OW) or the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP). This can include a decision to: refuse to give you financial assistance; reduce the amount of assistance you get; cut off your assistance. You may be able to appeal to the Social Benefits Tribunal. But first you must ask the office that made the decision to review its decision.


Your Money, Your Goals: A Financial Empowerment Toolkit for social service programs

Your Money, Your Goals: A Financial Empowerment Toolkit for community volunteers (Intro)

Your Money, Your Goals: A Financial Empowerment Toolkit for community volunteers

The goal of the Your Money, Your Goals toolkit is to make it easier for volunteers, lay counselors and workers, mentors, and coaches to help the people they serve become more financially empowered. Module 1-2: Setting goals, saving, and planning. Module 3-5: Managing income and spending money. Module 6-7: Debt and credit reports. Module 8: Money services, cards, accounts, and loans. Module 9: Protecting your money.



The Financially At Risk: Understanding the 12% of America That Experiences the Most Financial Stress

The Financially Striving: How 16% of Americans Are Working Toward Better Financial Lives

The Financially Unengaged: Reaching the 16% of Americans Who Aren’t In Touch With Their Financial Standing

Financial Capability Life Cycle

Financial Coaching Leads to Long-Term Financial Stability

On Policy Summer 2016

Integrating Financial Capability: A Toolkit for Social Service Organizations

Asset-Based Social Policies – A “New Idea” Whose Time Has Come?

Redeeming the American Dream. Children’s Savings Accounts (CSAs)Build Children’s Capacity For Economic Mobility

Fraud Prevention Kit


This is a presentation from the Bank of Canada on fraud prevention. Students in grades 9 to 12 will learn how to prevent losses due to bank note counterfeiting and identity crime. The kit includes a teacher’s manual, worksheets, Fighting Fraud on the Front Lines DVD, and much more.