Emerging Technology for All: Conversational AI’s Pivotal Role

This infographic is a preview of Commonwealth's research survey of 1290 lower-and moderate-income people to understand their perceptions, needs, and uses of conversational AI. 

Control, Sufficiency, and Social Support Lessons from Low-income Canadians about Financial Wellbeing

This report examines how diary participants achieve the financial wellbeing that they have. The evidence we found is that low-income people work very hard to manage their finances. They endeavor to control their finances so that, as one participant said, their finances don’t control them. They must prioritize needs and wants because there is not enough for both. One participant talked about her goal of having a ‘little bit more’ than her needs so that there was a little extra for savings or small purchases or trips. Finally, we saw that family and friends are terribly important for achieving financial wellbeing because social supports can provide loans, gifts, and emotional support. Having a low-income means that banks offer few financial supports. Of course, family and friends also make demands.

State of Fair Banking in Canada 2020: Borrower and Lender Perspectives

The DUCA Impact Lab defines fair banking as any financial product or service that lives up to the following set of principles:

  • Pricing is clear, transparent, and well understood
  • Pricing is representative of the cost of funds, cost of administration and risk, rather than what the market will bear
  • It is clear to all parties how any personal data is being used by the lender
  • Personal data is only used for purposes agreed to by both the borrower and lender
  • The terms and conditions, including penalties and the rights of each party are clearly explained and well understood by both lender and borrower
  • Products are only recommended that will bring the borrower closer to their expressed goals
  • The borrower is clear on what the institution will do (and not do), with deposits to earn a return
  • The assessment of risk is objective, transparent and not prejudicial
  • Financial institution recommendations are not biased towards in-house product recommendations
  • Products empower consumers when they need access to financial services, not just when they do not

Their Fair Banking 2020 report presents data on the following areas:

  • Debt load and its impact on Canadians
  • Financial confidence
  • Divide between borrowers and lenders
  • How financial products are priced
  • Poor credit and ability to access to financial product and services
  • Demographic snapshot: People of colour and Indigenous Canadians

 



Report on Income and Canadian Financial Consumer Complaints

This report explores the financial services complaint experiences of Canadians at various income levels who used the Ombudsman for Banking Services and Investments (OBSI)’s service. The national, not-for-profit organization collected demographic and case data for almost 1,000 closed cases resolved between 2017 to 2019 to create the report. These cases were grouped into three categories:

  • lower-income households (under $60,000);
  • middle-income households ($60,000 to $100,000); and
  • higher-income households (over $100,000).

Key findings include:

  • Lower-income households represent almost 40% of OBSI cases. Lower-income consumers of financial services need and make use of OBSI as an accessible alternative to the legal system.
  • Nearly one-third (30%) of employed complainants live in lower- or middle-income households. Canadians experience economic barriers to accessing legal services regardless of their employment status.
  • Most lower-income complainants are over 60, while most higher-income complainants are under 50. Older Canadians have a particular need for accessible dispute resolution.



Meeting the Emergency Moment: Key Takeaways from Delivering Remote Municipal Financial Counseling Services

Local governments across the United States are working to help their residents weather the health and financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. In many cities and counties, that means deploying their Financial Empowerment Centers (FECs), which provide professional, one-on-one financial counseling as a public service. Local leaders were able to offer FEC financial counseling as a critical component of their emergency response infrastructure; the fact that this service already existed, and was embedded into the fabric of municipal anti-poverty efforts, meant that it could quickly pivot to meet new COVID-19 needs, including through offering remote financial counseling.

This brief describes how FEC partners identified the right technology; developed skills to deliver counseling remotely; messaged the availability of FEC services as part of their localities’ COVID-19 response; and shared lessons learned with their FEC counterparts around the country.



Voice of Experience: Engaging people with lived experience of poverty in consultations

The engagement of Canadians with lived experiences of poverty in government consultations on poverty reduction is critical. But as hard as governments work to try to include people living in poverty as full participating members in their consultation processes, there are many barriers that continue to impede their participation. This paper explores what these barriers and impediments are.

COVID-19: Managing financial health in challenging times

This guide from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada shares guidelines and financial tips to help Canadians during COVID-19. The topics include: getting through a financial emergency, where to ask questions or voice concerns, what to do if your branch closes, and more.

State of Fair Banking in Canada

Everyone needs to bank and nearly everyone has a relationship with at least one financial institution. Financial Institutions need relationships with consumers too, in order to thrive as businesses. The role these relationships play in financial decision making for Canadians is an important consideration for anyone seeking to understand the financial health of Canadians and the impact of the banking sector in Canada. This report discusses the findings from a national sample of both banking consumers and lenders who were asked about their perspectives on fairness, access, credibility and transparency.



Financial Health Index: 2019 Findings and 3-Year Trends Report

This report explores consumer financial health, wellness/ stress and resilience for Canadians across a range of financial health indicators, demographics and all provinces excluding Quebec. This report provides topline results from the 2019 Financial Health Index study and three-year trends from 2017 to 2019.



The Present and Future of Bank On Account Data: Pilot Results and Prospective Data Collection

Bank On coalitions are locally-led partnerships between local public officials; city, state, and federal government agencies; financial institutions; and community organizations that work together to help improve the financial stability of unbanked and underbanked individuals and families in their communities. The CFE Fund’s Bank On national initiative builds on this grassroots movement, supporting local coalitions with strategic and financial support, as well as by liaising nationally with banking, regulatory, and nonprofit organization partners to expand banking access. This report details the Bank On Data Pilot, which collected and measured quantitative data on 2017 Bank On account usage at four pilot financial institutions with certified accounts: Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, U.S. Bank, and Wells Fargo.



2017 Bank On Data Pilot: Accessing Local Data

Bank On coalitions are locally-led partnerships between local public officials; city, state, and federal government agencies; financial institutions; and community organizations that work together to help improve the financial stability of unbanked and underbanked individuals and families in their communities. The CFE Fund’s Bank On national initiative builds on this grassroots movement, supporting local coalitions with strategic and financial support, as well as by liaising nationally with banking, regulatory, and nonprofit organization partners to expand banking access. This tool details the 2017 Bank On Data Pilot and includes instructions for accessing the local Bank On data at the city and zip code level.



Protecting vulnerable clients: A practical guide for the financial services industry

Firms and representatives in the financial services industry occasionally encounter situations where a client’s vulnerability causes the client to make decisions that are contrary to his or her financial interests, needs or objectives or that leave him or her exposed to potential financial mistreatment.

Because of the relationships they develop with their clients and the knowledge they acquire about clients’ financial needs or objectives over time, firms and representatives in the financial sector can play a key role in helping people who are in a vulnerable situation protect their financial well-being. They are instrumental in preventing and detecting financial mistreatment among consumers of financial services. Firms and representatives can also help clients experiencing financial mistreatment get the assistance they need.

This guide proposes possible courses of action to protect vulnerable clients. Its purpose is to provide financial sector participants with guidance on the steps they can take to help protect clients’ financial well-being, prevent and detect financial mistreatment, and assist clients who are experiencing this type of mistreatment.



Analyzing the Landscape of Saving Solutions for Low-Income Families

To address challenges around savings, the asset building and financial services fields have developed an array of solutions that attempt to support savings and wealth accumulation. However, the landscape of savings solutions is complex, difficult for households to navigate, and full of solutions that are not designed specifically for low-income and low-wealth households.

This brief examines the savings challenges that households face, their underlying causes, and a vision for new solutions. 



Strengthening retirement security for low- and moderate-income workers

In this video presentation Johnathan Weisstub from Common Wealth discusses recent improvements in senior Canadians' poverty levels due to benefits such as OAS and GIS, and the challenges that still remain in ensuring retirement security for modest-earning and low-income Canadians. 

This presentation was given at the Prosper Canada Policy Research Symposium on March 9, 2018.

Read the slide deck that accompanies this presentation.

View the full video playlist of all presentations from this symposium.



Activity sheet 4-10: Goals (Banking and financial services)

This activity sheet is from Module 4 of the Prosper Canada Financial Literacy Facilitator resources. Take a few minutes to how this workshop relates to your life, and set one or two goals for your use of banks and other financial services.

To view the full Financial Literacy Facilitator resources, click here.



Core competencies frameworks on financial literacy

Developed in response to a call from G20 Leaders in 2013, the core competencies frameworks on financial literacy highlight a range of financial literacy outcomes that may be considered to be universally relevant or important for the financial well-being in everyday life of adults and youth.

These documents describe the types of knowledge that youth aged 15 to 18, and adults aged 18 and up, could benefit from. 



Building consumer financial health: The role of financial institutions and FinTech

In this video presentation Rob Levy from the Center for Financial Services Innovation (CFSI) examines the role of financial institutions in building consumer financial health. 

This presentation was given at the Prosper Canada Policy Research Symposium on March 9, 2018.

Read the slide deck that accompanies this presentation.

Pour lire les diapositives de la présentation, cliquez ici.

View the full video playlist of all presentations from this symposium.



Retiring on a low income: Learnings


This is a webinar presentation recorded with John Stapleton at Prosper Canada on October 4th, 2016. John Stapleton is a Principal of Open Policy, and has worked for the Ontario Government for 28 years in the areas of social assistance policy and operations.

In the session John describes the differences between non-refundable and refundable tax credits, deductions, exemptions, and entitlements. He also reports on his learnings from presenting on tax credits and retiring on a low income to local Ontario audiences.

This is the webinar video recording.

For more information on retiring on a low income, including John’s updated toolkit with 2018 information, please visit: Open Policy Ontario.

 




2017 Financially Underserved Market Size Study


CFSI presents their 2017 Financially Underserved Market Size Study that illustrates the growing opportunity to address the needs of financially underserved consumers and identifies significant trends driving marketplace evolution and growth.



Where are the Unbanked and Underbanked in New York City?

Zambia Financial Diaries – Interim Report

Tackling financial exclusion: A country that works for everyone?

Tips for Providing Financial Capability Services to Immigrant Communities

Navigating the Market – A comparison of spending on financial education and financial marketing

Scaling Impact for Community Development Financial Institutions

Strengthening Banking in Inner-cities: Practices & Policies to Promote Financial Inclusion for Low-Income Canadians

From Financial Literacy to Financial Action

SAVED: Five steps for making financial decisions

Building blocks to help youth achieve financial capability: A new model and recommendations

Building blocks to help youth achieve financial capability: Report brief

myRA: A New Way To Save for Retirement

Aboriginal Financial Literacy in Canada: Issues and Directions

Financial Capability: What is it, and how can it be created?

Save for Your Child’s Education with an RESP

Shopping Around for a Mortgage

Shopping Around for a Line of Credit

Thinking of Opening a Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA)?

Understanding Variable Interest Rate Mortgages

Be Smart with Your Credit Card: Tips to Help You Use Your Credit Card Wisely

Cashing your Government of Canada Cheque for Free

Cheque Hold Periods: Your Right to Access Your Money


This is a guide on cheque hold periods when banking in Canada. When you receive a cheque, you may consider two things before deciding where to cash it: When can you get your money? How much will it cost you to cash the cheque? Although cheque cashing services may make money available immediately, they generally charge much higher fees than financial institutions do. If you have an account with a bank or another federally regulated financial institution, there are laws that set out when the institution must make the money from a cheque available to you. In most cases, you can get access to the first $100 right away if you choose to cash your cheque in a branch.


Choosing the Right Chequing Account and Banking Package

Choosing the Right Savings Account

How to Make a Complaint

What You Should Know if Your Branch Closes

International Review: Mobile Payments and Consumer Protection

Growing Youth Financial Capability through Workforce Development: Opportunities for Lawmakers & Advocates

Managing Debt: Getting Help from a Credit Counselling Agency

Opening a Personal Bank Account: Understanding Your Rights

Banking Fees in Canada: Patterns and Trends

An Invisible Finance Sector: How Households Use Financial Tools of Their Own Making

Spikes and Dips: How Income Uncertainty Affects Households

Fringe Financial Institutions, The Unbanked, and the Precariously Banked: Survey Results from Prince George, B.C.

All In: Building the Path to Global Prosperity Through Financial Capability and Inclusion

Banking the Unbanked? Evidence from Three Countries

Towards a Comprehensive and Inclusive Consumer Protection Framework for Canada. Submission to Finance Canada

Why Financial Capability Matters – Synthesis Report on Canadians and Their Money: A National Symposium on Financial Capability

Financial Inclusion for Homeless Persons and Those at Risk

Financial Literacy and Aboriginal Peoples

Financial Literacy and People Living on Low Incomes

Financial Experience & Behaviors Among Women

Creating Financially Capable Communities: A Resource Guide

Access to Capital and Credit in Native Communities

New York Financial Environment

Findings from the Citywide Financial Services Study

Immigrant Financial Services Study

Municipal Financial Empowerment: A Supervitamin for Public Programs. Strategy #3: Integrating Safe and Affordable Bank Accounts.

Adopting Effective Banking Practices. Ontario Edition

Financial Capability in the United States. National Survey – Executive Summary

2013 FDIC National Survey of Unbanked and Underbanked Households

2013 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice: Summary Results


The 2013 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice (SCPC) is the sixth in a series of annual studies
conducted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston to gain a comprehensive understanding of the cash and noncash payment behaviour of U.S. consumers. This report summarizes data collected in the 2013 SCPC and contains 57 tables with detailed estimates of the number of consumer payments, rate of adoption, and share of consumers using nine common payment instruments—cash, checks, money orders, traveler’s checks, debit cards, credit cards, prepaid cards, online banking bill payments (OBBP), and bank account number payments (BANP)— plus payments made directly from consumers’ income source. The report also contains estimates of consumer activity related to banking, cash management, and other payment
practices; consumer assessments of payment characteristics; and a rich set of consumer and
household demographic characteristics.


Addressing Income Volatility of Low Income Populations

Adeline’s dilemma: A GIS case study

Advancing Financial Coaching for Low-Income Populations: Midstream Lessons from EARN

Fair Financing: Expanding Small-Dollar Short-Term Credit for Albertans

Competing on Financial Health: How Credit Unions Can Win the Gen Y Market

Past Due: Debt-collection reforms that protect consumers not found to restrict credit availability

One Size Does Not Fit All: A Comparison of Monthly Financial Services Spending

How Should We Serve the Short-Term Credit Needs of Low-Income Consumers

The Compass Guide to Small-Dollar Credit

CFPB Proposal for Payday and Other Small Loans

Big Data, Big Potential: Harnessing Data Technology for the Underserved Market

Designing for Financial Health: Stories and profiles from the Financial Capability Innovation Funds

Expanding Financial Services to Underbanked Consumer: How Tax Preparation Partnerships Can Help Bridge The Gap

The Financially Striving: How 16% of Americans Are Working Toward Better Financial Lives

Aligning for Impact: Innovation in Short-term Lending Products

Investing in the American Dream: How Financial Institutions Can Build Long-Term Relationships with Immigrants Before and After Immigration Reform

What It’s Worth: Strengthening the Financial Future of Family Communities and the Nation

Summer Jobs Connect. More than a Job: Lessons from the First Year of Enhancing Municipal Summer Youth Employment Programs through Financial Empowerment

Income Volatility: Managing the Swings

Building financial capability in youth employment programs: Insights from a roundtable with practitioners

Integrating Financial Empowerment Strategies into Housing and Homelessness Prevention Programs

Banking the Poor: Policies to Bring Low-Income Americans Into the Financial Mainstream

Choosing Financial Services Where the Options are Limited: A Report on a Survey of Financial Service Choice of Residents in Inner-city Neighbourhoods in Toronto, Vancouver & Winnipeg

“There Are No Banks Here.” Financial & Insurance Exclusion in Winnipeg’s North End